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Ugh... time to cool down

Discussion in 'Random Nonsense' started by allenskd, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. allenskd

    allenskd Active Member

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    This post is me just rambling about programming in both python and javascript. Which I've been doing a lot today. I'm a tad stressed right now more due to Angular JS giving me the pointy finger. I feel a tad helpless when I'm introduced to a new framework you know. AngularJS isn't hard but it takes time to understand the core concepts. Sadly I have to go with the "learn as you go" and force myself to assume a lot of the functionality. Most of it I got it down, but when it comes down to directives and services and factories? Gotta slow down a bit because those three requires a lot of reading.

    I'm almost done with the application anyway, it's a web application of course. Lately I've been too obsessed with trying to resolve the issues my applications have that I lose the sense of time. It can't help but to pursue the problem and try to resolve it.... and the hours goes down the drain as a joke. I hate when that happens, a lot.

    Another project in Python I'm doing, I did a huge project restructure and committed the changes to bitbucket... I didn't think import would troll me. Let's say that I was setting up the project so I can easily set up setuptools (setup.py) and make my application be out there, then I noticed there were a lot of import errors, mostly because of course my application isn't installed in the sites-packages. So I spent hours searching for the problem until I read somewhere that just adding the path of your project to PYTHONPATH is fine. It was a mix of anger and bliss, ultimately it was a rookie mistake.

    Granted, I'm not a python developer myself. I've used it extensively with web applications, Java, etc, but OUTSIDE the web? This is my first time indeed. I worry sometimes about the outcome of having my project out there "will there be good feedback? or bad feedback?", "will I have a guy pestering me about how to do things "correctly" "

    Ah well, there's tomorrow. I don't have much problems with python at least, it's pretty darn straightforward. JavaScript and its lovely anonymous functions and how easy it is to do spaghetti code? not so much.
  2. booman

    booman Grand High Exalted Mystic Emperor of Linux Gaming Staff Member

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    I feel your pain. When I started learning actionscript and html years ago, I found it hard to learn because I had to trial-n-error in order to remember how it works. Its really a process of making mistakes and learning to fix them or avoid them.

    I have a hard time learning any new code because I want to makes something work NOW instead of learning the "Hello World" tutorials that are so slow...

    What I end up doing is copying someone else's code and learning how they use it by making my own changes.
    But I'm definitely not a passionate coder. I have only learned web code and its mostly for websites and interactive interfaces. Simple stuff for the most part, but you still have to be in the mindset of going back over the code and checking syntax and punctuation.... then debugging, fixing and re-coding.

    Gives me nightmares
  3. Gizmo

    Gizmo Chief Site Administrator Staff Member

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    I've almost got to the point of not using frameworks any more, because usually frameworks are poorly documented (and full of bugs), so I end up having to look at other people's code anyway. By the time I figure out how to use the framework and working around the bugs, I could have just written my own and been done with it.
  4. allenskd

    allenskd Active Member

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    I don't really find web frameworks to be buggy, granted I only stick to like two or three because well, if it works, why change it? Haha. What I don't like about frameworks is how they try to reinvent the wheel, stamp a new terminology on it and pretend it's different from the old one. In some Java frameworks I'm always wondering why the hell do they keep changing terms just for the heck of it :( Makes understanding it take longer.

    AngularJS documentation? Now that's another story, that thing REEKS of bad documentation. I'm glad they updated the docs because if they kept the old ones... the project would have died fast. Even so, it stills leave you wanting to know more... but ah well.
  5. Gizmo

    Gizmo Chief Site Administrator Staff Member

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    Re-inventing terminology is something that seems to happen about every decade or so in the software world. I think that's mostly to cover up the fact that the software industry hasn't come up with anything fundamentally new since the late 70s. In fact, one might be able to make the case that we've actually gone BACKWARDS.

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